Blog: A sneak peek behind the scenes at ASADA

27 June 2012

In the lead up to the London 2012 Olympics and Paralympics, Channel Seven News has taken a look at what goes on in the world of anti-doping. Read the transcript below.

NEWSREADER:
When Australian athletes head to the Olympics next month they won’t be our only team in London. We’re also sending drug testing experts considered the world’s best. They’ll be looking for any doping cheats to keep the Games fair for all.

REPORTER:
In the lead up months to any Olympics the pressure builds, the training hurts, and the scrutiny intensifies. These are testing times.

Recently Australia’s anti-doping officers swooped on our women’s water polo stars.

DOPING CONTROL OFFICER:
[Addressing athlete] You need to go into the bathroom and have your top raised to your chest and your pants down.

REPORTER:
Every Australian Olympian is tested before they leave for London. It’s intrusive and uncomfortable.
You’ve done it before?

VICTORIA BROWN:
Many, many times.

REPORTER:
But there are no complaints.

ROWIE WEBSTER:
I’m happy to get drug tested every day of the week for the rest of my life.

FIONA JOHNSON:
We’re actually helping them to achieve a level playing field, something that is really in every athlete’s dream.

REPORTER:
Australia’s anti-doping agency is world-class. London’s Olympic organisers have recruited more of our experts than almost any other country.

ILIJA DJUKIC:
You can’t but compare that we are up there with the best. We are probably the best.

REPORTER:
The World Anti-Doping Authority[sic] estimates 10 per cent of athletes are drug cheats. In London they’ll do a record 400 tests a day.

VICTORIA BROWN:
You hope that it doesn’t happen but I think the fact is that it does.

REPORTER:
The Australians will join around 1000 anti-doping officials working 24/7 for the 16 days of the Games, effectively one of the world’s biggest drug squads helping to keep the competition clean.

ILIJA DJUKIC:
It’s our chance to earn a gold medal in doping control, if you want to put it that way.

REPORTER:
Chris Reason, Seven News.