Corporate Plan 2016–17

The ASADA 2016–17 Corporate Plan covers the periods 2016–17 to 2019–20 as required under section 35(1)(b) of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013.

Message from the CEO

This Corporate Plan sets out the strategic direction and priorities of the Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority (ASADA) and how we intend to achieve our purpose over the coming four years.

As Australia’s national anti-doping organisation we are responsible for implementing an effective program consistent with international requirements and Australian legislation.

We seek to be innovative and agile in an environment where the integrity of fair competition is under threat globally. Almost daily we hear of one crisis or another in sport from evidence of state sponsored subversion of anti-doping processes to corruption and bribery allegations by officials. In such an environment it is vital that we do our best in the interest of clean athletes and the clean sport movement.

The purpose of this Corporate Plan is to articulate how we will carry out a rigorous anti-doping program that will provide the Government and community with a level of confidence about the integrity of Australian sport.

Everyone who plays a part in Australia’s national anti-doping framework will be faced with a number of opportunities and challenges over the next four years. I look forward to working with our stakeholders to ensure our response to doping in sport is unified and provides assurances to the international community that Australia is doing all it can to provide a platform for clean and fair sport.

As the accountable authority of ASADA, I present this 2016–17 Corporate Plan, which covers the periods 2016–17 to 2019–20, as required under section 35(1)(b) of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (the PGPA Act).

Ben McDevitt AM APM

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

 

Our vision

Clean, fair sport

 

Our mission

To protect clean sport through engagement, deterrence, detection and enforcement

 

Our purpose

The purpose of ASADA is to protect the health of athletes and the integrity of Australian sport through engagement, deterrence, detection and enforcement activities aimed at minimising the risk of doping.

How we achieve our purpose

Australia is a signatory to the UNESCO International Convention against Doping in Sport and is required to implement anti-doping arrangements in accordance with the principles of the World Anti-Doping Code (the Code). We collaborate with the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA), overseas anti-doping organisations and other stakeholders to further the Australian Government’s efforts to strengthen anti-doping practices globally.

Our role and functions are set out in the Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority Act 2006, the Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority Regulations 2006 and the National Anti-Doping (NAD) scheme. To achieve our purpose we provide the Australian sporting community with a range of activities:

Engagement: Strengthening relationships internally and externally to build anti-doping capabilities and harden the environment against doping in sport.

Deterrence: Minimising the risk of doping through education, communications and testing.

Detection: Gathering intelligence, targeted testing, and investigation of possible breaches of the anti-doping rules.

Enforcement: Managing possible anti-doping violations and presenting cases at hearings and appeals.

 

Our values

We apply the values of commitment, accountability and professionalism to all components of our work.

We aspire to achieve best practice through:

  • a world-class anti-doping program based on the Code, International Standards and legislated responsibilities
  • contemporary financial and governance practices that fulfil our obligations as a Commonwealth entity, and
  • commitment to the Australian Public Service Values set out in the Public Service Act 1999.

Our success will be underpinned by our investment in our capabilities and the relationships we make in the sporting and integrity sectors.

 

Our environment

Australia's anti-doping program operates in an international context. Since the introduction of the revised Code in 2015, national anti-doping organisations globally are facing increasing compliance demands and greater expectations to reduce the risk of doping in sport. It is a complex and dynamic environment that requires a proactive and strategic approach to building and maintaining global and domestic partnerships.

ASADA faces a number of internal and external factors that have the potential to affect our work and the regulatory environment in which we operate over the next four years.

Operational factors

  • Delivering our services under increasingly tight fiscal conditions.
  • Meeting increased costs of sample analysis.
  • Engaging with sport stakeholders, while also operating independently as our legislation mandates.
  • Overseeing sports compliance with anti-doping policies.
  • Assessing cost recovery measures for the services and activities provided to both government-funded and user-pays sports.
  • Increased non-analytical (no positive drug test) violations requiring greater intelligence-gathering and investigative capabilities.
  • More complex, protracted and contested enforcement activities.

Opportunities and challenges

  • Enhancing our engagement with sports to build anti-doping capability.
  • Strengthening our relationships with law enforcement and other regulatory agencies.
  • Expanding our intelligence and investigative functions.
  • Developing targeted responses to specific doping risks in sports.
  • Determining appropriate user-pays funding arrangements.
  • Leveraging technological advances to improve our interactions with athletes.
  • Contributing to international anti-doping efforts and capacity building.

Strategic risks

  • Increasing sophistication of doping.
  • Any future review of the global anti-doping system.
  • Adequacy of funding to meet our capability and operating requirements.
  • Competition from other integrity issues resulting in sports diverting funding away from anti-doping programs.

 

Our priorities

Delivering a leading anti-doping program

Amongst overseas national anti-doping organisations Australia has a reputation for delivering a highly effective and leading anti-doping program. Our expertise is often requested by our international partners who are looking at ways to bolster their own domestic programs. We plan to build on this reputation by examining how we operate and where opportunities exist to enhance our work in an environment challenged by increasing compliance demands and tight fiscal conditions.

Enhanced cooperation

We will continue to expand our intelligence and investigative functions through the negotiation of information-sharing arrangements with law enforcement and other regulatory agencies. This will strengthen our existing arrangements, which includes two secondment arrangements currently in place with the Australian Federal Police and Australian Border Force.

In doing our job we gather a large amount of information about the risk of doping in particular sports. In the coming years we plan to add value to our capability in this area by developing strategic and operational intelligence products to share with external stakeholders.

International collaboration

Over the next two years we will work with the National Anti-Doping Agency of India and WADA to strengthen Indian efforts in the fight against doping in sport. Under a Memorandum of Understanding we will contribute our operational expertise, identify areas for cooperation, and assist India in the enhancement of its anti-doping program.

2018 Gold Coast Commonwealth Games

The Australian Government allocated $1.5 million in the 2016–17 Budget for ASADA to deliver an effective pre-Games anti-doping program for the Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games. We will work closely with stakeholders to put in place a pre-Games program consistent with the Code and International Standards.

 

Our performance measures

Our performance tells us something important about the success of our work to protect the health of athletes and the integrity of Australian sport by minimising the risk of doping. How we measure performance in our engagement, deterrence, detection and enforcement activities helps us understand, manage, and improve what we do.

Engagement

Strengthening relationships internally and externally to build anti-doping capabilities and harden the environment against doping in sport.

MEASURE

Achievement of ASADA legislation and Code awareness amongst sporting organisations, athletes and support personnel.

DESCRIPTION

This measure assesses the percentage of sporting organisations, athletes and support personnel aware of ASADA legislation and the Code.

METHOD

Annual stakeholder survey

TARGET

2016­­–17

80% level of awareness

2017–18

80% level of awareness

2018–19

80% level of awareness

2019–20

80% level of awareness

PREVIOUS RESULTS

97% legislation awareness and 99% Code awareness (2015–16)

MEASURE

Achievement of anti-doping rights and responsibilities awareness amongst sporting organisations, athletes and support personnel.

DESCRIPTION

This measure assesses the percentage of sporting organisations, athletes and support personnel aware of their rights and responsibilities in relation to anti-doping.

METHOD

Annual stakeholder survey

TARGET

2016­­–17

80% level of awareness

2017–18

80% level of awareness

2018–19

80% level of awareness

2019–20

80% level of awareness

PREVIOUS RESULTS

100% (2015–16)

 

Deterrence

Minimising the risk of doping through education, communications and testing.

MEASURE

Achievement of satisfaction with anti-doping education and awareness raising activities in the sporting community.

DESCRIPTION

This measure assesses the percentage of national sporting organisations, athletes and support personnel who are satisfied with anti-doping education and awareness raising programs.

METHOD

Education participation survey  

TARGET

2016­­–17

80% level of satisfaction

2017–18

80% level of satisfaction

2018–19

80% level of satisfaction

2019–20

80% level of satisfaction

PREVIOUS RESULTS

89% (2015–16)

MEASURE

Achievement in minimising the risk of an accidental breach of the anti-doping rules by athletes.

DESCRIPTION

This measure assesses the percentage of athletes agreeing that ASADA’s education and information services had minimised their risk of an accidental breach of the anti-doping regulations.

METHOD

Annual stakeholder survey

TARGET

2016­­–17

80% level of agreement

2017–18

80% level of agreement

2018–19

80% level of agreement

2019–20

80% level of agreement

PREVIOUS RESULTS

88% (2015–16)

MEASURE

Achievement in deterring doping through anti-doping testing activities.

DESCRIPTION

This measure assesses the percentage of stakeholders who rate ASADA’s testing activities as an effective way to deter athletes and support personnel from doping.

METHOD

Annual stakeholder survey

TARGET

2016­­–17

80% level of agreement

2017–18

80% level of agreement

2018–19

80% level of agreement

2019–20

80% level of agreement

PREVIOUS RESULTS

84% (2015–16)

 

Detection

Gathering intelligence, targeted testing, and investigation of possible breaches of the anti-doping rules.

MEASURE

Achievement in delivering effective anti-doping intelligence and investigative functions.

DESCRIPTION

This measure assesses the percentage of national sporting organisations, athletes and support personnel who view ASADA’s intelligence and investigative functions as effective at deterring athletes and support personnel from doping.

METHOD

Annual stakeholder survey

TARGET

2016­­–17

80% level of effectiveness

2017–18

80% level of effectiveness

2018–19

80% level of effectiveness

2019–20

80% level of effectiveness

PREVIOUS RESULTS

83% (2015–16)

MEASURE

Achievement in anti-doping activities maximising doping detection.

DESCRIPTION

This measure assesses the percentage of national sporting organisations, athletes and support personnel who are confident that ASADA’s activities maximise doping detection.

METHOD

Annual stakeholder survey

TARGET

2016­­–17

80% level of effectiveness

2017–18

80% level of effectiveness

2018–19

80% level of effectiveness

2019–20

80% level of effectiveness

PREVIOUS RESULTS

76% (2015–16)

 

Enforcement

Managing possible anti-doping violations and presenting cases at hearings and appeals.

MEASURE

Achievement of anti-doping rule violation findings in tribunals.

DESCRIPTION

This measure assesses the percentage of cases conducted by ASADA in tribunals that result in a finding of an anti-doping rule violation.

METHOD

Information from ASADA’s case management system, published outcomes of cases

TARGET

2016­­–17

80% of tribunal findings result in an anti-doping rule violation

2017–18

80% of tribunal findings result in an anti-doping rule violation

2018–19

80% of tribunal findings result in an anti-doping rule violation

2019–20

80% of tribunal findings result in an anti-doping rule violation

PREVIOUS RESULTS

100%

 

 

Our capability

Achieving our purpose requires a skilled and flexible workforce. We identify and address our future needs in capability through workforce planning and capability development.

Workforce capability

The decline in our overall funding (30 per cent in real terms since 2006) combined with the drop in the revenue we receive from user-pays testing has had a significant impact on our staffing (from 78 staff in 2013–14 to 50 by 2017). This has impacts across all of ASADA’s functions, including our testing, investigative, education and administrative areas. Despite the decline in funding, we have managed to preserve our reputation as one of the world’s leading anti-doping agencies.

Maintaining this reputation is due in part to our workforce planning process that started in 2014. The initiatives we have put in place ensure investment in staff capability is oriented towards areas of priority. In the short-term our focus remains on enhancing our intelligence and investigations functions, by encouraging secondments and establishing resource sharing arrangements with relevant law enforcement and other regulatory agencies. Our efforts in this area are primarily aimed at maintaining ASADA’s expertise at the forefront of global anti-doping efforts.

Ultimately, the skill of our workforce is important to our ability to respond effectively to the challenges posed by tight fiscal constraints in an increasingly sophisticated doping environment.

ICT capability

Technology plays an important part in how we work from managing our processes to delivering anti-doping information to athletes and sports. Over a number of years we have looked into opportunities to benefit from existing systems developed by our partners overseas to improve our ICT infrastructure. We are also looking to invest in advanced data analysis tools and capabilities to further support our push towards an intelligence-led anti-doping program.

During 2015–16, ASADA transitioned two online services used extensively by athletes to mobile-enhanced replacements:

  1. In January 2016, athlete whereabouts information was moved over to WADA’s ADAMS system. With a range of enhancements, ADAMS makes it easier for athletes to enter, view and change their whereabouts information.
  2. From April 2016, Australians wanting to search the status of a medication in sport were directed to Global DRO, a new mobile-enhanced replacement for our Check Your Substances search tool. The advantage of Global DRO for Australian athletes is that they can now search the status of ingredients and brands of medications that they might encounter outside of Australia.

Our work with law enforcement continues to gather momentum with the push to enhanced information-sharing arrangements placing greater requirements on the security of our ICT infrastructure. In 2015, our ICT network was certified to PROTECTED status to enable the sharing of information between agencies. We are committed to maintaining our ICT infrastructure to a standard that provides confidence to the sporting, law enforcement and regulatory communities.

Over the next four years we will look to the ongoing simplification of our ICT, including the continued leveraging of existing technology used by our overseas partners.

 

Our risk oversight and management

We undertake our functions in an environment of sophisticated doping activities and increasing legal challenges to ASADA’s investigation and enforcement processes by well-resourced athletes and support personnel. Working in this environment requires ASADA to maintain a robust and flexible risk management strategy.

Our level of risk management capability is aligned with the requirements of section 16 of the PGPA Act and is founded upon principles set out in ISO 31000 Risk Management – Principles and Guidelines and the Commonwealth Risk Management Policy.

We operate to a Risk Management Framework that embeds risk management in all ASADA’s operational and corporate activities. We do not view risk management as a stand-alone process. It is entrenched in our business planning and resource processes and is closely aligned with a range of other business processes that are performed within the agency, including fraud control, internal audit and business continuity processes.