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About Asada

About ASADA

Pure
Performance

Sport is a powerful cultural force in Australia.

It is ASADA’s role to preserve and protect sport’s value – not only for athletes, support persons and sporting organisations – but for all Australians.

Pure Performance is a concept that encapsulates the health and fitness aspect of sport, the talent and dedication of athletes and ethical competition.

ASADA aims to ensure that the pure spirit of sport remains in play.

Watch a video introducing anti-doping at ASADA [streaming FLV - 12.43MB]

Watch a video on the history of anti-doping [streaming FLV - 8.29MB]

The Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority (ASADA) is a government statutory authority that is Australia's driving force for pure performance in sport.

ASADA's mission is to protect Australia's sporting integrity through the elimination of doping.
To achieve its mission ASADA focuses on three key themes - to deter, detect, and enforce:

  • ASADA deters prohibited doping practices in sport via education, doping control (testing), advocacy and the coordination of Australia's anti-doping program;
  • ASADA detects a breach of a sport's anti-doping policy via its doping control (testing) and investigation programs; and
  • ASADA enforces any breach of a policy by ensuring those violating anti-doping rules are prosecuted and sanctioned.

ASADA reports to the Minister for Sport. From its head office in Canberra, ASADA operates under strict corporate governance guidelines and works closely with the Office of Sport within the Department of Health.

 

Our purpose

To protect Australia's sporting integrity through the elimination of doping.

Our Vision

Australia’s driving force for pure performance in sport.

The ASADA Act

The ASADA Act is the Act of Federal Parliament that defines ASADA and what ASADA’s powers, functions and responsibilities are.

ASADA Act on ComLaw website [external link]

Key changes made to the ASADA Act in 2013

Changes to the ASADA Act will strengthen Australia’s anti-doping efforts and will better protect the majority of Australian athletes and support personnel who are doing the right thing.

Around the world doping offences have traditionally been detected through the testing of blood and urine samples to identify the presence of a banned substance. However, well organised and systemic doping programs can operate without detection by existing testing regimes. With doping becoming increasingly sophisticated, it is less likely that anti-doping rule violations will be detected through testing alone.

In 2006, Australia was the first country to introduce intelligence and investigations into an anti-doping detection program. Only through the application of investigative techniques and intelligence gathering, combined with an effective drug testing program, can ASADA effectively identify those athletes and support personnel who are involved in sophisticated doping practices.

In January 2013, the Hon James Wood QC AO handed the Australian Government his findings and recommendations following a review of Cycling Australia. The review was conducted in the wake of revelations of widespread and systematic doping violations in professional road cycling.

In the review Mr Wood recommended the need to strengthen ASADA’s capabilities. In particular, he recommended that the ASADA Act and other relevant legislation be amended to give ASADA a power, subject to appropriate protections, to compel persons to attend an interview and to produce information and documents relevant to any inquiry that it is conducting.

On the back of Mr Wood’s review amendments have been made to the ASADA Act. The main changes to the ASADA Act include:

ASADA CEO powers

The legislative changes enhance ASADA’s investigations and intelligence gathering capacity. When necessary the ASADA Chief Executive Officer (CEO) will be able to require someone to assist with an investigation by issuing a notice (to be known as a disclosure notice). This notice can require a person to do one, or more of the following:

  • attend an interview to answer questions;
  • give information; and/or
  • produce documents or things (a legal term meaning pretty much any thing)

The ASADA CEO can only issue a disclosure notice if they reasonably believe the person has information, documents or things that may be relevant to the administration of the National Anti-Doping (NAD) scheme.

Role of the Anti-Doping Rule Violations Panel (ADRVP)

The ASADA CEO does not have unfettered authority to issue a disclosure notice. A disclosure notice may only be issued if three members of the ADRVP agree in writing that the belief of the CEO is reasonable.

Disclosure notice

Aspects related to the issuing of the disclosure notice are specified in the legislation. This includes the format and content of the disclosure notice; conduct of interviews; retaining and making copies of documents and the use of information gathered from the disclosure notice. The amended legislation will also require ASADA to inform the person of their rights and the possible consequences for failing to comply with a disclosure notice. These rights include permitting an interviewee to have someone accompany them to the interview and not being required to answer questions that may incriminate, or expose the person to a penalty.

ASADA will only issue a disclosure notice when it is necessary to compel a person to assist with an investigation. This will usually be as a last resort.

Civil penalties and infringement notice

The changes to the Act now provides for civil penalties (up to $5,100 per day) to be determined by a court for failing to comply with a disclosure notice. The infringement notice may be offered to a person who is alleged to have contravened a civil penalty provision under the Act, as an alternative to the matter being determined before a court.

Final decision maker

The national sporting organisation still remains the final decision maker on whether an anti-doping rule violation has occurred and, if so, what sanction should be applied. There needs to be sufficient evidence to demonstrate that the person has committed a violation, in accordance with the levels of proof specified in the World Anti-Doping Code.

General information: issuing a disclosure notice

A disclosure notice issued by the ASADA CEO requiring a person to attend an interview to answer questions must include a date, time and location of an interview.

In the first instance the interview must take place at least 14 days after the date of the notice unless exceptional circumstances apply which give rise to a need to proceed more quickly. For example, if it is important to obtain information before a person leaves the country for an international competition, or where there are concerns about serious health issues arising from doping.

The person issued with a disclosure notice (the recipient) is able to seek alternative arrangements if the arrangement causes undue hardship. However, the final decision on interview arrangements rests with the CEO.

If the CEO agrees to a different date, time and location a replacement disclosure notice will be issued.

A notice to attend an interview must include:

  • the date and time of interview, which must be at least 14 days after the date of the notice (or less if exceptional circumstances exist)
  • the location of the interview
  • a statement that the recipient may contact the CEO to offer a different date, time or location because there would otherwise be undue hardship (and this statement must also include the process for deciding the issue)
  • a statement that the interview may be conducted over more than one day
  • a statement that the recipient must attend the interview
  • a statement that the recipient is excused from complying with a requirement to answer a question if the answer to the question might tend to incriminate the recipient or expose them to a penalty
  • a statement that the recipient may be accompanied at the interview and outlining the process required to be followed
  • a statement that if the recipient is under 18 they may be accompanied by one or two people, one of which may be a legal practitioner.

The changes to the Act now provides for civil penalties (up to $5,100 per day) to be determined by a court for failing to comply with a disclosure notice. The infringement notice may be offered to a person who is alleged to have contravened a civil penalty provision under the Act, as an alternative to the matter being determined before a court.

Consolidated ASADA Regulations including NAD scheme

The Regulations are made under the ASADA Act, and contains the NAD scheme.

ASADA Regulations on ComLaw website [external link]

Strategic Plan

Purpose

To protect Australia’s sporting integrity through the elimination of doping.

Vision

Australia’s driving force for pure performance in sport.

 

Values

ASADA adheres to the Australian Public Service Values and Code of Conduct, which are available on the Australian Public Service Commission website at www.apsc.gov.au

We adopt diversity principles in all aspects of our work; we are committed to creating an environment that values and utilises the contributions of people with different backgrounds, experiences and perspectives, and respect the rights of individuals in how we adopt, implement and enforce anti-doping rules.

 

Strategic objectives

Leadership in anti-doping program delivery
  • Implement world-leading anti-doping programs that make best use of all of the resources available, with a focus on emerging technologies and trends.
  • Partner with domestic and international agencies to improve the exchange of anti-doping information and intelligence.
  • Develop and implement comprehensive education, communication and awareness programs and initiatives.
Engaged, motivated,ethical and skilled people
  • Foster a culture of collaboration, innovation, high performance and commitment to ASADA’s purpose.
  • Promote shared understanding of our goals, and those of the government.
  • Empower staff to harness opportunities to use and develop their expertise, experience and knowledge.
  • Nurture future leaders.
Productive stakeholder relationships
  • Develop strong, trusting working relationships with government, domestic and international stakeholders within the anti-doping community, sport, and law enforcement.
  • Promote awareness and understanding of our role and the principles of doping-free sport within the sporting and wider community.
  • Contribute to whole-of-government initiatives to protect the integrity of sport in Australia.
International engagement and influence
  • Contribute to building the capacity of developing anti-doping organisations, particularly in the Asia-Oceania region.
  • Influence the international anti-doping agenda, and the development and implementation of international policy, including the World Anti-Doping Code and International Standards.
Robust corporate governance and financial sustainability
  • Implement financial sustainability and accountability frameworks to guide and support planning and decision making.
  • Develop corporate governance and quality management frameworks to ensure compliance with legislative and regulatory requirements and manage risk.
  • Review the efficiency and effectiveness of ASADA’s structure, administrative arrangements, processes and systems to meet the current and future needs of the organisation.
  • Safeguard the privacy, security and confidentiality of individuals through robust policies and practices.


Download the ASADA 2011-14 Strategic Plan [PDF - 2.22MB]

Powers and functions

ASADA's purpose, as described above, is to protect Australia's sporting integrity through the elimination of doping.

 ASADA consists of  the CEO and the ASADA staff. ASADA’s function is to assist the CEO in the performance of his or her functions.

The following is a list of CEO functions that ASADA performs, and the powers that allow ASADA to achieve them.

CEO Functions:

(a) such functions as are conferred on the CEO by Part 2;

(b) such functions as are conferred on the CEO by the NAD scheme;

(c) to advise the ASC about sports doping and safety matters that should be included in any agreement under which the ASC gives money to a sporting organisation;

(e) to support, encourage, develop and implement initiatives that increase the skills and knowledge of people involved in sporting activities about sports doping and safety matters;

(f) to support and encourage the sporting community to develop and implement comprehensive programs, and education initiatives, about sports doping and safety matters;

(g) to support, encourage and conduct research about sports doping and safety matters;

(h) to collect, analyse, interpret and disseminate information about sports doping and safety matters;

(i) to encourage the development of ways for the States and Territories, and sporting organisations, to carry out initiatives about sports doping and safety matters;

(j) to cooperate with the States and Territories, and with sporting organisations, to carry out initiatives about sports doping and safety matters;

(ja) to cooperate with an organisation of a foreign country in the Oceania region that has functions that are the same as, or similar to, those of the CEO;

(k) to provide the following services under contract on behalf of the Commonwealth:
(i) anti‑doping testing services;
(ii) safety checking services;
(iii) other services (including educational services) relating to sports doping and safety matters;

(ka) to make resources and facilities (including secretariat services and clerical assistance) available to the Advisory Group for the purposes of enabling the Advisory Group to perform its function;

(kb) to make resources and facilities (including secretariat services and clerical assistance) available to the ADRVP for the purposes of enabling the ADRVP to perform its functions;

(l) to make resources and facilities (including secretariat services and clerical assistance) available to the ASDMAC for the purposes of enabling the ASDMAC to perform its functions;

(m) such other functions as are conferred on the CEO by this Act or any other law of the Commonwealth;

(n) to advise the Minister about matters relating to any of the above functions;

(o) to do anything incidental to or conducive to the performance of any of the above functions.


Powers:

The CEO has the power to do all things necessary or convenient to be done for or in connection with the performance of his or her functions.

Reconciliation Action Plan

The Australian Sports and Anti-Doping Authority believes that reconciliation between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and non-Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians requires:

  • Acknowledgement of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people as the original custodians of this land
  • Mutual respect and a shared understanding
  • Equal participation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the Australian community.

ASADA has worked with Reconciliation Australia to develop a Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP)
Download ASADA's RAP [PDF - 96KB]